The Charlevoix Declaration

Prioritizing the needs of refugee and other conflict and crisis-affected girls.

Location: Global

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  “People used to overlook the importance of girls education. I took it as a challenge.” -Jubilee Barua, 30, a teacher in Kutupalong refugee camp.    Over 600,000 people, largely stateless Muslims from the northern part of Rakhine State, have fled into neighbouring Bangladesh to escape the ensuing violence.    © UNHCR/Roger Arnold

“People used to overlook the importance of girls education. I took it as a challenge.” -Jubilee Barua, 30, a teacher in Kutupalong refugee camp.

Over 600,000 people, largely stateless Muslims from the northern part of Rakhine State, have fled into neighbouring Bangladesh to escape the ensuing violence.

© UNHCR/Roger Arnold

With forced displacement on the rise, and the length of time families spend as refugees now at an average of 26 years, millions of refugee children are at risk of losing out on learning.  Within this reality, girls in particular are at risk of missing out on education: they are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than boys.

Recognizing the transformative power of education, Canada committed to prioritizing the needs of refugee and other conflict and crisis-affected girls this summer, through a groundbreaking policy and financial commitment at the G7 Leaders’ Summit in June.

The Charlevoix Declaration on Quality Education for Girls, Adolescent Girls and Women in Developing Countries represents a joint effort from the Leaders of G7 countries to step up for girls and women in crisis, conflict and fragility – and includes a specific commitment to close the gap in access to education for refugees both within and outside refugee camps. Focusing both on dismantling the barriers to education and improving the quality of education, Leaders’ committed to promote and work to improve learning outcomes for both refugees and host communities, while also working to reduce the time children are out of school as a result of conflict and displacement.

To support the implementation of the Charlevoix Declaration, Canada also led the mobilization of $3.8 billion CDN, including a $400 million contribution from Canada itself. With contributions from the World Bank, the European Union, Japan, Germany, and the United Kingdom, the Canadian-led initiative represents the single largest investment in education for girls in conflict and crisis settings.