The Education Response Plan (ERP) for Refugees and Host Communities in Uganda

The first ever multi-year education response plan that bridges the humanitarian development nexus in order to deliver quality, accredited learning to refugee and host communities

Location: Uganda

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  Venetia*, 9, is an unaccompanied child refugee from South Sudan. She had not been to school since 2016 but has been able to enrol in a government school in Imvepi settlement in Uganda thanks to their progressive policies.    Uganda is one of the top refugee hosting countries worldwide, and its progressive policies and approach to refugees, despite increasing refugee numbers and stretched capacity, stands in stark contrast with that of many of the world’s richest nations    © Save the Children/Juozas Cernius

Venetia*, 9, is an unaccompanied child refugee from South Sudan. She had not been to school since 2016 but has been able to enrol in a government school in Imvepi settlement in Uganda thanks to their progressive policies.

Uganda is one of the top refugee hosting countries worldwide, and its progressive policies and approach to refugees, despite increasing refugee numbers and stretched capacity, stands in stark contrast with that of many of the world’s richest nations

© Save the Children/Juozas Cernius

Uganda hosts the largest number of refugees in Africa, with more than 130, 000 refugees having arrived this year. This is a children’s crisis with more than 60% of the refugees under the age of 18 – the majority live in under resourced areas of Uganda and more than half remain out of school.

There is a refugee education emergency, but there is also an opportunity to get things right. The First Lady and Minister for Education of Uganda, Janet Museveni, along with donors, UN agencies and NGOs, have launched a new education response plan (ERP) to capitalise on this opportunity.

The ERP shows how an average of 567,500 refugee and host community learners per year aged 3-24 in 12 refugee-hosting districts in Uganda can be reached with improved education services, at a total cost of USD 389 million over 3.5 years.

The process has been led by the Ugandan government to ensure genuine inclusion of refugee children in the national education system, and the plan focuses on improving equitable access to inclusive relevant learning opportunities, as well as the delivery of quality education services and training.

The coordinated plan will also overcome the highly fragmented short-termism of refugee education funding with shared responsibility. Education Cannot Wait has recognised the potential of the ERP to transform how investment in refugee education happens.

The focus now is on the international community to fund the ERP fully - this is an opportunity that cannot be missed.