Little Ripples

Improving learning outcomes through refugee-led early childhood education.

Location: Eastern Chad

Improvement_v1.png
 
  “I’ve seen differences in my students. Before [Little Ripples training], children were not consistently coming. Now, we have many children always wanting to attend and coming each day excited and happy. Even me, I am more positive with my students now.”    -- Kaltoum, from Darfur, lives in refugee Camp Djabal, Eastern Chad.   © iACT/ Gabriel Stauring

“I’ve seen differences in my students. Before [Little Ripples training], children were not consistently coming. Now, we have many children always wanting to attend and coming each day excited and happy. Even me, I am more positive with my students now.”

-- Kaltoum, from Darfur, lives in refugee Camp Djabal, Eastern Chad.

© iACT/ Gabriel Stauring

Eastern Chad hosts over 320,000 refugees from Darfur, Sudan, across twelve camps, who fled their homes in early 2003 because of conflict. Almost fifteen years later, ongoing crises in Darfur prevent families from returning. Funding reductions have left huge gaps in providing quality services for refugees, especially in the provision of early childhood education (ECE), which is critical for securing later positive learning outcomes.

Humanitarian efforts toward refugee self-reliance along with the fact that ECE is most impactful when parents, caregivers and educators are supportive and supported, means engaging refugees as the primary leaders and stakeholders in the creation of ECE programs is essential.

iACT have facilitated a refugee led program, Little Ripples, to improve the provision of ECE for refugees in Eastern Chad.  Through teacher training and professional development, Little Ripple transforms untrained refugee men and women into skilled teachers and leaders with the confidence to deliver, lead, and scale comprehensive ECE.

The program is led by refugee teams of camp coordinators, education directors, and teachers, who design the program, finalise learning space construction, lead peer-to-peer teacher training, and maintain community engagement.  With this leadership, Little Ripples is now operating in four camps in Eastern Chad, reaching almost 3,000 children to date through an evidenced-based and culturally-adapted curriculum with play-based learning, peacebuilding, mindfulness, and positive behavior management.

The Little Ripples model has demonstrated: delivery of a high-quality, context- and culturally-specific curriculum; high student attendance rates; teacher retention rates of 80% over five years; and program sustainability. Next steps include continuing to document the refugee-led model in Chad and the resulting decrease of refugee dependency, increased community agency, and increased quality of education, as well as expanding the model to other contexts globally.

For more information please contact Sara-Christine Dallain, Director of International Programs  scd@iactivism.org