Every Child Learning

Leveraging partnership and technology to improve the learning outcomes of Syrian and Jordanian children.

Location: Jordan

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  Samer**, 11, a refugee from Syria now living in Jordan, who fled his home five years ago, takes class at his school in Amman, Jordan. Jordan’s inclusive education policy is critical to securing positive learning outcomes for refugee children – but its public school system is over stretched.   © Save The Children/ Ahmad Muhsen

Samer**, 11, a refugee from Syria now living in Jordan, who fled his home five years ago, takes class at his school in Amman, Jordan. Jordan’s inclusive education policy is critical to securing positive learning outcomes for refugee children – but its public school system is over stretched.

© Save The Children/ Ahmad Muhsen

More than 650,000 Syrian refugees have arrived in Jordan since the start of the Syrian war, around of half of whom are children. In Jordan, school-aged refugees can be enrolled into the national education system. However, despite this inclusive policy, learning outcomes for children are not improving - the education system is strained, and dropout rates are high.

In order to help children re-engage with learning, Pearson and Save the Children developed ‘Every Child Learning’ in partnership with the Jordanian Ministry of Education. Together, they are developing and piloting innovative education interventions to take to scale.

One such intervention is an app called “Space Hero” (Batlalfada), which was designed by Pearson in collaboration with refugee and Jordanian children, aged 9-12, to strengthen their math skills. The app follows the story of Shehab (Arabic for shooting star) as he travels back to earth. It is available on the Google Play store to download for free, so that children can access learning anywhere at any time.

The app supports a broader in-school programme led by Save the Children that focuses on teachers’ professional development, relations between schools and communities, remedial education and psychosocial support. The pilot will improve the learning and well-being of 3,915 people directly, including 3,280 Jordanian and Syrian children aged 9 to 12 years from grades 4 to 6 (1,840 boys and 1,440 girls).

For more information please contact Emma Wagner, Education in Emergencies Policy and Advocacy Adviser, Save the Children, e.wager@savethechildren.org.uk