BACK TO THE FUTURE

Working in partnership to improve the inclusion and learning outcomes of refugee children through a holistic approach

Location: Lebanon and Jordan

Inclusion_v1.png
Improvement_v1.png
 
  A young girl attends lessons inside Moasad Center School in Saida, Lebanon. Seven years into the crisis in Syria, Lebanon hosts 1 million registered Syrian refugees, the highest per capita number of any country.   © Terre des Hommes/Diego Ibarra Sánchez

A young girl attends lessons inside Moasad Center School in Saida, Lebanon. Seven years into the crisis in Syria, Lebanon hosts 1 million registered Syrian refugees, the highest per capita number of any country.

© Terre des Hommes/Diego Ibarra Sánchez

The conflict in Syria continues to produce the gravest displacement crisis in the world; Lebanon and Jordan are at the forefront of the crisis and this has significantly impacted their socioeconomic growth. Such circumstances are bringing unbearable burden to the education system and children are exposed to continuous protection threats.

With the support of the EU Regional Trust Fund ‘MADAD’ AVSI, War Child Holland, Terre des Hommes Italy and Terre des Hommes Netherlands launched the project ‘Back to the Future’, to promote enrolment and retention in the formal education system for refugee and vulnerable children from host communities in Lebanon and Jordan, while contributing to create a suitable learning environment by rehabilitating 43 governmental schools.

Project activities are designed and implemented in strict coordination with the Ministries of Education in Lebanon and Jordan and include: Early Childhood Education, Basic Literacy and Numeracy, Foreign Language Courses, Homework Support, Remedial Classes and Psychosocial support. Awareness campaigns on the right to education, expected to reach more than 50, 000 parents and caregivers, are conducted. Active participation of children and their families and positive interaction with the host community are encouraged. All educational activities are complemented with extra-curricular and psychosocial ones, to ensure children grow up in a safe and supportive environment.

A holistic approach to child development guides the project activities which tackle the various challenges vulnerable children may face regarding their education (readiness, access and retention, protection, inclusion and psycho-social well-being). The three main actors concerned with the education process (families, communities and institutions) are mobilized to ensure a strong and durable impact.

Over a 30-month period, the project will enable more than 30,000 Syrian, Lebanese and Jordanian children to access education.

For more information please contact Paul Wolters, Terre des Hommes, p.wolters@tdh.nl