An Integrated Approach to Addressing the Needs of Adolescent Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

Implementing an integrated education and protection programme for adolescents.

Location: Lebanon

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  Seven years into the crisis in Syria, Lebanon hosts 1 million registered Syrian refugees, the highest per capita number of any country. Plan International’s research found that refugee young people are vulnerable to early marriage and child labour.   © Plan International

Seven years into the crisis in Syria, Lebanon hosts 1 million registered Syrian refugees, the highest per capita number of any country. Plan International’s research found that refugee young people are vulnerable to early marriage and child labour.

© Plan International

Plan International’s recent needs assessment found that children and youth, who comprise 53.5% of the refugee population in Lebanon, continue to face complex protection issues and a very concerning 59% of Syrian refugees between 3 and 18 years old living in Lebanon are out of formal schooling.

In response, War Child Holland, Plan International, the Lebanese Organisation for Studies and Training and Akkar Network for Development, are implementing an integrated education and protection programme for adolescents and their caregivers. The programme is using a gender responsive and age-sensitive integrated model to address the risks of child and early marriage and child labour, both of which the needs assessment found to be preventing adolescent refugees from attending school in large numbers and adolescents in host communities in smaller yet significant numbers.

Although the main target group are at risk adolescents from refugee and host communities, the project includes a strong community-based approach and an advocacy component, addressing community leaders, service-providers, and other influencers at the local and national levels. The project builds on lessons learned among consortia members, including recognition that engaging at risk adolescents in education and psychosocial support activities gives both a sense of normalcy and routine.

This approach both serves as an entry point for enhancing knowledge, coping skills and protective behaviors as well as being a protection mechanism itself for adolescents, reducing risks of engaging in negative coping mechanisms like child marriage and child labour.  

For more information please contact Leslie Archambeault, Humanitarian Policy and Advocacy Manager, Leslie.Archambeault@plan-international.org